Home » Gluten Free Seeded Loaf (Mixed Seed Bread)

Gluten Free Seeded Loaf (Mixed Seed Bread)

| | byKat |111 Comments

You will love this gluten free seeded loaf, with its soft and chewy crumb, deliciously crisp crust, and amazing flavour thanks to the abundance of mixed seeds. This gluten free bread recipe is incredibly easy to make and only requires a single rise.

A loaf of mixed seed bread on a copper wire cooling rack, with a few pieces already cut.

Hi friends! Your eyes do not deceive you – this is indeed a brand new gluten free bread recipe, and one that’s been in the works for a while now.

In fact, this is probably one of my favourite gluten free bread recipes I’ve made to date. It’s incredibly soft and chewy, with a crisp crust and an amazing flavour thanks to the abundance of mixed seeds. On top of that, it’s also incredibly easy (and relatively quick) to make, requiring only a single rise rather than the more standard two rounds of rising.

(Side note: if you’re after even more delicious gluten free bread recipes, you should definitely check out my upcoming book on gluten free baking, Baked to Perfection. It includes over 15 gluten free bread recipes – from artisan loaves and burger buns, to baguettes and bagels. You can find more information and all the pre-order links here!)

Gluten free seeded loaf on a copper wire cooling rack.

I’ve received numerous comments and messages about my Ultimate Gluten Free Bread recipe since I published it back in April. I still can’t actually believe just how many of you have made it since then (many on a weekly basis!), and it warms my heart to see the photos of all your gorgeous loaves.

There have also been many questions about adapting the recipe, and most of these fell into one of four categories: how to scale up the recipe (to make a larger loaf, so it will last longer), how to bake the bread in a loaf tin (so it’s more convenient for making sandwiches), whether it’s possible to skip the first rise, and whether it’s possible to include seeds.

This recipe is my answer to these questions and requests.

In developing this gluten free seeded loaf:

  1. I’ve increased the amount of dough by 50%, so that it perfectly fills a 2lb/900g loaf tin. The result is a gorgeous, tall loaf that is perfect for slicing and making sandwiches. At the same time, it’s still small enough so that it bakes through nicely without its middle becoming sticky or gummy. Instead, it has a beautifully open, chewy crumb.
  2. I’ve tested the bread with only a single rise – and it works really well! While two rounds of rising give a slightly richer flavour, you can definitely get away with just one proof in the loaf tin, if you want to save on time.
  3. I’ve added a very generous amount of seeds into the dough. I used a seed mix (consisting of linseed, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds), but you could easily use whichever seeds you have on hand. The bread also works great with chopped nuts (walnuts are a favourite of mine) or dried fruit (figs or cranberries work particularly well).
  4. I’ve optimised the baking times and temperatures to give a crust that isn’t too hard – instead, the crust is caramelised and pleasantly crisp.

Gluten free seeded loaf on a copper wire cooling rack.

Before we get to the bits and bobs of making this wonderful bread – if you like what you’re seeing, subscribe to my newsletter to keep up to date on the latest recipes and tips!

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Note: the whole recipe, including the ingredient quantities, can be found at the bottom of this page – just scroll down to the bottom, or click the ‘Jump to Recipe’ button at the top of this post.

How do you make a gluten free seeded loaf?

For detailed step-by-step photos of making a gluten free bread dough and more information about the importance of psyllium husk in gluten free bread baking, I recommend you have a look at my Ultimate Gluten Free Bread recipe.

Making this gluten free seeded loaf is incredibly easy:

  1. In a small bowl, mix together the yeast, sugar and warm water. Let it stand for 10-15 minutes until the mixture starts frothing – this is a good indication that the yeast is active.
  2. In a separate small bowl, mix together the psyllium husk and water to make a psyllium gel.
  3. Whisk together the buckwheat flour, tapioca starch, millet flour and salt.
  4. Make a well in the middle of the dry ingredients, and add the yeast mixture, psyllium gel and apple cider vinegar.
  5. Knead all the ingredients together into a smooth, soft and slightly sticky dough that should come away from the sides of the bowl. You can knead it by hand or using a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook.
  6. Add the seeds and knead them into the dough until evenly distributed.
  7. On a lightly oiled surface, shape the dough into a log that comfortably fits into a 2lb/900g loaf tin.
  8. Transfer the dough into the tin and gently press it down to even out the top.
  9. Cover loosely with cling film and allow it to proof in a warm place for 1 hour 15 minutes – 1 hour 30 minutes, until approximately doubled in volume.
  10. Sprinkle with extra seeds and bake!

See? Not difficult at all.

Cross-section of a gluten free mixed seed loaf.

Top tips

Here are the most important things to keep in mind when making this recipe:

  • Make sure that all your gluten free flours are finely milled/ground – they should be fine powders, not coarse like polenta. Coarsely ground flours don’t absorbs moisture as well, which can result in a runny, very sticky dough.
  • I recommend you use the rough husk form of psyllium husk rather than the powder. However, if you do use psyllium husk powder, use 75-85% of the quantity of rough psyllium husk listed in the recipe. Note that there is no substitute for psyllium husk!!
  • If you don’t like your bread to be moist, I recommend you remove the loaf from the baking tin and bake it directly on the oven rack for the last 15 minutes (keeping the top covered with aluminium foil, shiny side up). This will help dry out the middle of the loaf even more – just note that this will also further crisp up and dry out the crust.
  • Allow the loaf to cool COMPLETELY before cutting into it! While I 100% get the temptation of cutting into a warm loaf of bread, cooling is a very important step in gluten free bread making. If you cut into a warm or hot gluten free loaf, the inside could be quite sticky. Allowing the loaf to cool sets the crumb and ensures that beautiful open, chewy crumb – no stickiness in sight.

Possible substitutions

Although all the ingredients in the recipe should be easily accessible either in your local grocery store or online, I still wanted to include a list of substitutions you can make.

  • Active dried yeast: You can use instant yeast, in which case you don’t need to activate it, but just add it straight to the dry ingredients along with the sugar. Add the water that would be used in activating the active dried yeast to the dry ingredients along with the psyllium gel and apple cider vinegar.
  • Apple cider vinegar: You can use other types of vinegar, although I recommend sticking to apple cider vinegar if at all possible.
  • Psyllium husk: YOU CAN’T SUBSTITUTE IT WITH A DIFFERENT INGREDIENT. But, if you use psyllium husk powder as opposed to the rough husk form, use only 75-85% of the weight listed in the recipe.
  • Buckwheat flour: You can use white teff flour, sorghum flour or oat flour instead.
  • Tapioca starch: You can use corn starch, potato starch or arrowroot starch instead.
  • Millet flour: You can use brown rice flour instead.

A note on measurements (tl;dr: if possible, use a scale)

While I’ve included the volume measurements (cups and spoons) in the recipe card below, if at all possible (and I really cannot overemphasise this): USE METRIC GRAM MEASUREMENTS IF YOU CAN.

They’re much more precise and produce more reliably delicious results. This is true for pretty much all of baking – a kitchen scale will invariably give better results than cups and tablespoons.

And… that’s it. A brand new, glorious gluten free seeded loaf recipe that’s as delicious as it is easy to make. I hope you’ll enjoy it.

Happy baking,

Signature of the author, Kat.

A hand holing a piece of gluten free seeded loaf.

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Gluten Free Seeded Loaf (Mixed Seed Bread)

You will love this gluten free seeded loaf, with its soft and chewy crumb, deliciously crisp crust and amazing flavour thanks to the abundance of mixed seeds. This gluten free bread recipe is incredibly easy to make and only requires a single rise. 
Print Rate
4.8 from 30 votes
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook/Bake Time 1 hr 15 mins
Rise Time 1 hr 15 mins
Total Time 3 hrs
Servings 1 loaf

Ingredients

  • 12 g (1 tbsp) active dried yeast
  • 20 g (2 tbsp) superfine/caster sugar
  • 585 g (2 ⅓ cups + 1 ½ tbsp) warm water, divided
  • 30 g (⅓ cup + ½ tbsp) psyllium husk (rough husk form)
  • 195 g (1 ⅓ cups) buckwheat flour
  • 150 g (1 ⅓ cups) tapioca starch
  • 135 g (1 cup) millet flour
  • 10 g (2 tsp) table or sea salt
  • 15 g (2 ½ tsp) apple cider vinegar
  • 150 g (1 cup) mixed seeds, such as linseed, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds, divided
  • 1 UK medium/US large egg, whisked, for egg wash (optional, omit if you want the bread to be vegan)

Instructions

  • Get a 2lb/900g loaf tin ready to have on hand (you can line it with baking/greaseproof paper, which will also help you remove the baked loaf from the tin).
    Tip: Dimensions of a 2lb/900g loaf tin: 8.5 inch/21cm long, 4.5 inch/11cm wide and 3inch/7cm high.
  • In a small bowl, mix together the yeast, sugar and 240g (1 cup) warm water. Set aside for 10 – 15 minutes, or until the mixture starts frothing.
  • In a separate bowl, mix together the psyllium husk and 345g (1 ⅓ cups + 1 ½ tbsp) water. After about 15 – 30 seconds, a gel will form.
  • In a large bowl, mix together the buckwheat flour, tapioca starch, millet flour and salt, until evenly combined.
  • Add the yeast mixture, psyllium gel and apple cider vinegar to the dry ingredients. Knead the dough until smooth and it starts coming away from the bowl, about 5 – 10 minutes. You can knead by hand or using a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook.
  • Add about 120g (¾ cup) of the mixed seeds and knead them into the dough until evenly distributed.
  • Transfer the bread to a lightly oiled surface and knead it gently, forming it into a log that comfortably fits into the 2lb/900g loaf tin. Transfer the dough into the tin (seam side down) and gently press it down to even out the top.
    Tip: This recipe works really well with just a single rise. But, if you want to do two rounds of rising, first place the dough into a lightly oiled bowl, cover it with a tea towel and allow to rise in a warm place for about 1 hour or until doubled in volume. Then proceed with this step.
  • Lightly cover with cling film and allow to rise in a warm place for 1 hour 15 minutes – 1 hour 30 minutes or until approximately doubled in volume.
  • While the bread is proofing, adjust the oven rack to the middle position, place a baking tray on the bottom rack of the oven, and pre-heat the oven to 480ºF (250ºC).
  • Once risen, lightly brush the top of the bread with egg wash and sprinkle with the remaining seeds.
    Tip: If you want the bread to be vegan, brush it with a bit of water instead, before sprinkling on the seeds. To make sure that the seeds stick better, you could add a bit of sugar or maple syrup into the water.
  • Place the proofed bread into the oven on the middle rack, pour boiling hot water into the bottom baking tray, spray the bread 4-5 times with water (optional), and close the oven door.
  • Bake at 480ºF (250ºC) with steam for 15 minutes – don’t open the oven doors during this initial period, as that would allow the steam to escape out of the oven.
  • After the 15 minutes, remove the bottom tray with water from the oven, reduce the oven temperature to 430ºF (220ºC), and bake for a further 60-70 minutes in a steam-free environment. The final loaf should be of a golden brown colour. If the loaf starts browning too quickly, cover with a piece of aluminium foil, shiny side up, and continue baking until done.
    Tip: If you don’t like your bread to be moist, I recommend you remove the loaf from the baking tin and bake it directly on the oven rack for the last 15 minutes (keeping the top covered with aluminium foil, shiny side up). This will help dry out the middle of the loaf even more – just note that this will also further crisp up and dry out the crust.
  • Remove the baked loaf out of the baking tin immediately out of the oven and transfer it onto a wire cooling rack to cool completely before cutting into it.
  • Storage: The gluten free bread keeps well wrapped in a tea towel in a cool dry place for 3 – 4 days.

Notes

POSSIBLE SUBSTITUTIONS
  • Active dried yeast: You can use instant yeast, in which case you don’t need to activate it, but just add it straight to the dry ingredients along with the sugar. Add the water that would be used in activating the active dried yeast to the dry ingredients along with the psyllium gel and apple cider vinegar.
  • Apple cider vinegar: You can use other types of vinegar, although I recommend sticking to apple cider vinegar if at all possible.
  • Psyllium husk: YOU CAN’T SUBSTITUTE IT WITH A DIFFERENT INGREDIENT. But, if you use psyllium husk powder as opposed to the rough husk form, use only 75-85% of the weight listed in the recipe.
  • Buckwheat flour: You can use white teff flour, sorghum flour or oat flour instead.
  • Tapioca starch: You can use corn starch, potato starch or arrowroot starch instead.
  • Millet flour: You can use brown rice flour instead.
NOTE: All substitutions should be made by weight not by volume.
Tried this recipe?Mention @theloopywhisk or tag #theloopywhisk!

 

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111 thoughts on “Gluten Free Seeded Loaf (Mixed Seed Bread)”

  1. I have been buying gluten free bread for a number of years and never really loved it till I found a delicious brand a few years ago which was expensive. We are in lockdown in NZ so I decided to bake my own, I found your recipe for two styles of gluten free bread, WOW they both way out do any other bread I have ever tried, my husband is a total fan of this seeded loaf, the only gluten free bread he has ever deemed worth eating. I now am baking this twice weekly as it’s totally delicious keeps fresh till the next loaf and longer if I need. Thank you for all the research that has gone into your recipe it works wonderfully.

    Reply
  2. I’ve tried a few of your recipes now, including this one, and you’re a genius. Thanks for a great recipe. Without the egg wash, it’s even vegan. Huge hit over here with my adult kids and their vegan friends. I’m trying to figure out of there’s a tweak to ingredients or process that will result in a less thick/hard crust. Oven temp is calibrated. Proper size pan used. Recipe followed to a T, nothing wrong with the recipe. It’s foolproof actually, so easy. We just prefer a softer, thinner, crust. Anyone know if that’s possible? If not, still making this again! Thank you so much for the best gf/vegan bread I’ve ever had (and I’ve made and bought sooooo many gf loaves of bread).

    Reply
  3. Hi – I love your recipes and love your new cookbook – received it a couple weeks ago!
    I’m currently on a restricted diet – no nuts or seeds allowed. How can I alter this recipe to exclude nuts? Will leaving nuts/seeds out alter the bread?

    Thanks!

    Reply
  4. What a superb bread! Soooooo happy!!! This is the best EVER GF bread we have ever made!!! Followed the tip of Amy Rose Chicoine and mixed the dry Psysillium Husk Powder into the other dry ingredients. Had to put up a big fight to get the bread out of the form as had omitted to line the tin with baking paper first. Took me about 15 minutes of hard work to get it out. Super happy with the result of the bread. It almost has the consistency of sourdough type German bread. Used the full amount of seed mix in the bread, we used 1/4 part pepitas, 1/4 part sesame seeds and 1/2 part of broken walnut pieces. Added more sesame seeds on top of the bread after the egg wash. Next time will most likely take the bread out of the (lined) tin 15 minutes before the end of the baking process to finish baking it on the rack without the tin. Was still slightly moist inside. Toasted the bread slices several times fresh on low heat, turned out perfectly. Bread kept very well on the counter for three days while we have cooler wheather still.
    Our next approach will be to make the bread with different flours like rice flour etc. as suggested. Thank you so, so much for this recipe!

    Reply
  5. I’ve made this recipe 3 times now and love it. It’s so much better than most gluten free breads out there. I recently had to go low FODMAP and so I’ve had to figure out life without wheat.
    One tip I’ve found with this, is if you are using psyllium husk powder, mix the powder in with the dry ingredients and then just add the water straight to the dry mix. When I made a gel with the psyllium powder prior to mixing in it got so hard that it was difficult to mix in to the main dough and caused lumps of hard gel to end up in the final loaf.
    Otherwise, great recipe, great site, and can’t wait to start baking from the book!

    Reply
  6. I love this bread recipe and use it regularly and vary the seeds and flours. Today I used brown teff flour instead of millet flour and added caraway seeds to the seed mix. Delicious. Thanks for sharing your excellent recipes Kat. Very grateful.

    Reply
  7. Hi, Kat. Thank you VERY MUCH for sharing this amazing recipe! I was so excited to find you on instagram and today I made this bread. Can I ask you one question? It’s my first time using buckwheat flour so I don’t know if it’s normal or not… the buckwheat flavor is way too distinctive… and my bread came out almost gray-ish black, not that it was burnt, but because of buckwheat flour. I used Bob’s Red Mill whole grain organic buckwheat flour, which I guess is the most average one? Is there like white buckwheat, black buckwheat?

    The texture was so amazing, I couldn’t believe it was GF, only the buckwheat flour smell was too strong and the dark color, nothing like the picture. I think your recipe is perfect but maybe there’s a different kind of buckwheat flour in every region…? Confused 🙁

    Reply
    • Hi Lee, I’m so glad you enjoyed the recipe!! Bob’s Red Mill buckwheat flour does sometimes cause a bit of trouble, giving a strong flavour and a dark colour to the bread, as you’ve observed. You can try using another brand (they tend to vary quite widely) or you could try using white teff or sorghum flour – the latter especially gives a wonderful flavour to gluten-free bread. Happy baking! xx

      Reply
    • Hi Kirsi, I don’t recommend it as it would cause the bread to over-proof and have a dense texture as a result. You could try prolonging the proofing time by placing the dough into the fridge immediately after shaping, but make sure to bake it as soon as it doubles in volume.

      Reply
  8. This is my go to recipe for GF bread! Never fails and have been baking it on a weekly basis for quite some time! I use chia and linseed and sometimes pumpkin sunflower and sesame but soak them first which sometimes means I have to put a drop more water in… also use a mix of water and yogurt whey as always have surplus whey to get rid of… and use buckwheat, tapioca and brown rice flour… Also made your amazing chocolate cake receipe the other day! AMAZING! Love your recipes 🙂

    Reply
  9. I have a gluten sensitivity and a casein allergy and have tried so many bread loaf recipes. This is by far the best one! Thank you so much for creating it. I made it and it came out great the first time. I should have kept a closer eye on it, and put foil on the top much sooner though; the next loaf! I like a honey-wheat bread, and I’m wondering how much honey I could add without hurting the integrity of the loaf …

    Reply
  10. Finally! A gluten-free bread with good taste and the spongy texture that are missing in all other recipes I’ve tried. Thank you.

    Reply
  11. Hi Kat –
    is there any reason water measurements in grams not ml…. I believe liquids are always measured in ml not in grams ….

    Reply
    • Hi Julia, I actually prefer measuring liquids in grams, as I find it much easier and more precise. For example, it’s super easy to measure out 365g water, but it will be tricky to *accurately* measure out 365ml of water, unless you’re working with a lab-grade measuring cylinder.

      Reply
  12. I accidentally mixed the psyllium husk (not as gel) in with the dry ingredients! I added the full amount of water listed though, do you think the bread will still bake off successfully?

    Reply
    • Hi Deborah, the bread should still bake up successfully, but the dough will probably be much looser and slightly trickier to work with initially. After the first rise, the psyllium husk should absorb the moisture, so the dough should be easier to handle afetrwards.

      Reply
  13. I made this today and it turned out great. I used oat flour and brown rice flour because that’s what I had on hand. I was skeptical when I mixed the psyllium husk with the water and it was all lumpy, but it came together perfectly. Since I’m recently wheat-free its nice to have a go-to bread recipe!

    Reply
  14. Could this be baked in a Pullman loaf pan? I live at high altitude and have adjusted the yeast but after 2 tries it has still overproofed in 30 min. I reduced the yeast to 9 g and 15 g for the sugar on the last try. I will keep trying! If leaving seeds out would it need more salt for flavor?

    Reply
    • Hi Bonnie, I’ve never made it in a Pullman loaf pan so I couldn’t say for certain – it would definitely be very important to make sure that the Pullman pan is large enough so that the loaf has enough room to expand (so it doesn’t end up too dense). Another possible problem with baking it in a Pullman loaf would be that you couldn’t achieve the same amount of steam evaporation, which could result in a sticky crumb. That said, it’s impossible to know without trying, so you can definitely give it a go! 🙂 The loaf shouldn’t need more salt if you leave the seeds out, but it’s also down to personal preference how “salty” you like your bread to be.

      Reply
  15. hello, Im making the bread right now for the first time, its in the oven right now. But while kneading the dough it remained quite sticky….was that ok…or should I have added more flower?

    thx Janneke

    Reply
    • Hi Janekke, the dough shouldn’t be very sticky, but it should bake up OK even if it is slightly sticky. What can sometimes happen is that if your flours are on the coarser side, they don’t absorb the moisture as well as they should, which results in a slightly wetter/stickier dough. Hope your bread turned out OK anyway! xx

      Reply
  16. Hi Kat,
    I love the recipe, very easy to make and the result is fabulous!
    I was thinking if the loaf would work with plain gluten free flour? Have you tried it before by any chance?
    Thanks, Camilla

    Reply
    • Hi Camilla, so glad you enjoyed it! I don’t recommend using a plain gluten-free flour, it usually has a too high of a starch content, which would negatively impact the texture of the bread. In general, gluten-free bread requires a very specific flour profile to get a good crumb, which is why I recommend using a mix of individual gluten-free flours.

      Reply
  17. Hi Kat! I’m happy to say that I’ve had great success with this bread recipe since it’s posting! I’m wondering if you have ever experimented baking bread with bean flours, Lupini bean more specifically. I would like to boost the protein content in my bread loaves, but I’m not sure about the ratios of flour to starch.
    Thanks,
    Despina

    Reply
    • Hi Despina, so glad you’ve been enjoying the bread! I have to say I’ve never experimented with bean flours – but if you do give them a try, do let me know how they turn out!

      Reply
    • OMG. Best GF bread recipe yet. I was skeptical, but I’ve tasted and believe. Going to try it again tomorrow and bake for the freezer.
      Thanks so much!

      Reply
  18. Hi, I really love you page and look forward to trying this bread out!
    I have all the ingredients except for millet flour. I saw that it’s possible to use brown rice flour instead but I don’t have that either. Do you think white rice flour would work? I also have maize, teff, sorghum, buckwheat, oat and tapioka flour at home.
    Thank you in advance!
    /Sara from Sweden

    Reply
    • Hi Sara! In my experience, white rice flour behaves quite differently than brown rice flour, so it’s not the best substitution. If you don’t have any millet or brown rice flour on hand, I’d go with sorghum flour instead.

      Reply
    • Hi Stacy, I’m not quite sure why you’d want to use a smaller amount of yeast and no sugar? But I suppose it should work, so long as you prolong the proofing time – the bread will probably need longer to double in volume.

      Reply
  19. This bread is amazing! I make versions of it a couple of times a week cause I go through it that quickly! I love adding fruit, nuts, molasses and cinnamon to it to make a spiced fruit loaf! Its so light and bubbly! (one happy coeliac!)

    Reply
  20. I recently made your artisan bread for my mom with Celiacs Disease and she absolutely loved it! I have a quick question about the seeds…I have a 7-seed mix that I use in my sourdough and it needs to be soaked for about an hour, probably due to the chia and flax in it. Would you recommend soaking the seeds for this as well, or do you think it would make the dough too wet?

    Reply
    • Hi Colette, I’m so glad your mom enjoyed the bread! I’m honestly not 100% certain, as I’ve never worked with such a seed mix before. My best guess would be to soak the seeds and be sure to really squeeze out any excess water before adding it into the dough. Without soaking them, what might happen is that the chia and flax absorb a lot of moisture from the dough, which would make it too stiff to rise properly. Hope this helps! xx

      Reply
  21. Hi, I was wondering if this can be baked in a convection oven with a reduced baking temperature of about 25 deg F?

    Reply
  22. I love your gluten-free artisan loaf but I’m sorry to say that this one was a total fail for me. With the original amount of water called for in the recipe, the dough was super dry and crumbly so I added more while mixing. It proofed nicely, I baked it as instructed and the moment I took it out of the oven it sank. That made me think it’s probably still raw inside so I put it back into the oven for another 20 minutes, covered with aluminum foil. The bread baked a total of 1 hour and 35 minutes and came out raw. I really don’t know what went wrong.

    Reply
    • Hi Ana, that’s quite odd, the amount of water is definitely correct and this recipe has been made by many people already with no issues. I’m honestly not sure what went wrong there, it should definitely be baked after that long in the oven. Are you sure your oven is correctly calibrated? If it runs a bit cold, that could be the reason for the loaf taking longer…

      Reply
  23. Love this ! Made it 3 times and perfect each time, thank you! The texture is lovely. I’d love to double recipe for a really big tin loaf. Do I double all ingredients including the yeast? Thanks so much!

    Reply
    • So glad you enjoyed it, Lisa!! I wouldn’t recommend doubling the recipe. With gluten-free bread, moisture evaporation is super important in ensuring a good bread crumb (that isn’t dense, sticky or gummy). If you make a much larger loaf, the moisture evaporation from the centre is greatly reduced. So, I’d recommend making two separate loaves of this size, rather than one loaf twice this size.

      Reply
  24. Made this twice and it is amazing. I like it better than any GF bread recipe I have tried. Its so light and flavorsome. It freezes so well to. Thank you! If I want to make a really big loaf can I double everything including the yeast?

    Reply
    • I’m so glad you like the loaf!! I wouldn’t recommend doubling the recipe and making a much larger loaf – with gluten-free bread, moisture evaporation is key to a really good bread crumb (one that isn’t dense, sticky or gummy) and with large loaves, moisture evaporation from the centre is greatly reduced. I would recommend making two loaves rather than a single loaf twice as large.

      Reply
  25. Hello! What can i substitute the millet flour with Please? Thanks again!!!
    Also, if using GF sourdough starter instead of yeast, how much would I add please?

    Thanks!

    Reply
    • Hi Stacey, you can use finely milled brown rice flour instead of the millet flour. I haven’t tested this recipe with Gf sourdough starter personally, but I’ve been told by other that it works well, I believe they used about 100g of starter.

      Reply
  26. This is the best gluten free bread I have done. The proportion between the different flours, the water, the yeast and the psyllium is just perfect.
    The bread really doubled in volume, this never happened usually with gluten-free flour.Thank you so much for your recipe!

    Reply
  27. At first I thought – there must be misprint, 480F! Yikes. I was worried I would end up with toast. But I cooked it as directed and WOW.. This bread is delicious, moist, flavorful, with a crispy crust and taste almost like a rye bread. I should of never doubted, everything I cook from your website turns out! I can’t wait for your book!

    Reply
  28. Hi Kat,
    I really love your bread recipes and have just purchased your baking book. I no longer purchase bread from shops and just make your loaves instead. I am coeliac but have just found out I may have an intolerance to yeast. Is it possible to substitute anything for the yeast – baking power etc?

    Reply
    • Hi Carole, you could try using a gluten-free sourdough starter. And I also have a gluten-free soda bread recipe in the book, that doesn’t use any yeast.

      Reply
  29. Wonderful recipe ~ I echo everyone else’s compliments. I have baked the seeded for the first time ~ all went well. It rose up but it has shrunk back down during baking ~ still tastes delicious but it does not look like yours in the pictures which seems to be taller. Only change I made was I split it into 2 and used 2 x 1lbs trays to bake it ~ many thanks in advance

    Reply
    • Hi Will, I’m really glad you enjoyed the recipe! If the loaf has shrunk during baking, it’s possible that it was a bit over-proofed. Maybe try a shorter proof next time and see if it makes it better?

      Reply
  30. My dough was quite wet and sticky which made kneading properly almost impossible. I’ve never made gluten free bread before so I’m not sure whether this is normal or if I got something wrong? The result was a fairly decent looking loaf, but quite dense, almost like a Rye loaf texture. That said, it still tastes great! I usually hate gluten free bread (I made it for my husband), but I may just switch to this if I can get it right! Any tips pls?

    Reply
    • Hi Nicole, GF bread dough is typically a bit sticky, but this one shouldn’t be super wet. If you had trouble with the dough and also the final bread texture, it could be due to the flours you used. Were all your flour finely milled (as in, had the texture of a fine powder)? Or were they on the coarser side, like grits or polenta? If they were coarse, that could have been the problem – coarse flours inhibit proper moisture absorption and make the dough very wet.

      Also, what kind of psyllium husk did you use? The rough husk or the fine powder form?
      Finally, did you change anything about the recipe?

      Reply
  31. Thanks for sharing this great recipe. Wonderful texture and flavour. I’m wondering about the quantity of water…my scale weighs out 2 and 1/3 cups plus 1.5 tbs of water at around 455 grams, not 585 as stated. That would be too much water.

    Reply
    • Hi Helen, I’m so glad you’ve enjoyed the bread!! In a standard conversion, where 1 cup = 240mL = 240g water (and 1 tbsp = 15mL = 15g water), 2 1/3 cups + 1.5 tbsp comes to 583g, rounded up to 585g, so it is definitely correct. I’ve actually developed the recipe with weights, so the gram measurements are 100% correct! If your cup measurements are different, it could be that they’re incorrectly calibrated. Also, gluten-free bread always requires significantly more water than a wheat-based recipe due to the higher water absorption capacity of gluten-free flours.

      Reply
  32. After 4 years of trying different GF bread recipes, this one is the best. It replicates the gluten breadmaking with GF ingredients, is easy to handle, doesn’t require special equipment and it looks like regular bread. I just love it.
    Can this bread be refrigerated or frozen? This is only my second loaf but on the first one, wrapping it in a towel, the crust became hard before I could finish the loaf. With my current loaf, I started out with just the towl and now I am keeping it in the towel and placed it in an open plastic food storge bag. I can tell the towel is more damp feeling on the bottom. I’m in Florida and am concerned that it will start molding before I can finish the bread, I’m the only one eating it. Any thoughts?

    Reply
    • I’m SO HAPPY you’ve enjoyed my GF bread recipe!! I personally haven’t tried freezing it, but I’ve been told by several readers that it works really well (they’ve sliced it, frozen it and then toasted it, and it was apparently delicious).

      Reply
  33. Hi Kat, Love this and your Ultimate Gluten Free Recipe! I’m in the US, so thanks for giving weights as it avoids the teaspoon/cup conversions between UK and US sizes. 🙂 A couple of questions: Is there a reason you didn’t increase the sugar, salt, and vinegar by 50% for this recipe? Since we’re dissolving the sugar in water is there a need to use caster sugar? I’ve ordered some Dove Farms Plain White Flour to try your pizza crust (I’m thinking the addition of maize flour will give it a great taste). Thanks for your recipes!

    Reply
    • Hi Scott, I’m so glad you’re enjoying my bread recipes! I actually use the standard US cup conversion (1 cup = 240 mL), but always recommend that gram measurements are used if at all possible – they’re so much more precise and reliable.

      To answer your questions:

      1) No special reason, really. The base recipe is incredibly flexible and the amounts of sugar, salt and vinegar can be easily tweaked. The sugar is there to give an initial boost to the yeast, not for a sweet flavour. I found that I prefer this bread with slightly less salt, but you could easily add a bit more if you want. With the vinegar, I use it primarily to make the yeast a bit more active (by creating a slightly acidic environment), and I’ve found that the amount used here gives a very soft, open crumb – I wasn’t going for very big holes in the crumb. Again, if you want a slightly more sour flavour, feel free to increase the amount of vinegar slightly.

      2) No need to use caster sugar, I just always use it in my baking as my go-to. Granulated sugar will work perfectly well here.

      I hope you’ve enjoyed my GF pizza crust – I actually have a wonderful new (and greatly improved) recipe in my upcoming book! 🙂

      Reply
  34. What a great recipe, I can’t wait to try. I have digestive problems and this bread will be perfect for me. My dear, can I use sourdough instead of dry yeast?
    Thank you so much:)

    Reply
    • Hi Claudia, I personally haven’t tried this with a GF sourdough starter, but I’ve been told that it works great by other readers who have tried it. 🙂

      Reply
  35. You’ve absolutely done it again Kat! I am in freshly baked bread heaven. Another truly delicious recipe, with clear and easy to follow instructions. I’ve just pre-ordered your book and cannot wait for March to come, I’m truly hoping you have a fabulous white baguette recipe in there. If not, start experimenting please?!! 😂 Oooo, actually croissants would be amazing too. You truly are a genius, thank you 🙏🏾

    Reply
    • Hi Alythia, I’m so glad you like the recipe!! Thank you so much for pre-ordering my book – if you haven’t yet, be sure to get your free bonus e-book with extra recipes as a thank you for pre-ordering! 🙂 I do have an amazing baguette recipe in Baked to Perfection, and I’m currently working on a GF croissant recipe. I’ve 99% mastered GF Danish pastry (recipe coming to the blog soon!) and I’m hoping delicious GF croissants are in my near future. 😉

      Reply
  36. Delicious, my other half says its the best GF loaf he’s tasted 😁
    Easy to make and has turned out perfectly each time, now making every 4/5 days. One question.. has anyone tried freezing the loaf?
    Can’t wait for the upcoming GF book and more bread recipes to try.. thanks Kat, you’re a genius!

    Reply
    • Hi Sue, I’m so glad both of you enjoyed the bread! I haven’t tried freezing it personally, but I’ve been told by several other readers that it freezes really well (they’ve frozen individual slices and then toasted them). I really hope you’ll love the book as well! xx

      Reply
  37. What a great recipe! So easy to do too! I have never made bread from scratch and decided to attempt this one. It came out GREAT! And oh so soft too. My family was impressed by how TASTY it was “…for gluten-free bread!” Woohoo! Thank you!

    Reply
  38. Hi Kat. I am so pleased to have found your site and excellent bread recipes – my husband has been coeliac for over 20 years and says the bread is the best he has tasted! I have been making both styles (including the ‘seeded’ as a plain loaf using oat and brown rice flours, which is really lovely!) and wondered if you have any advice for baking more than two loaves at once? I tried two overlapping in time but the second one came out a bit flat so I wondered if they were ‘competing’ for the heat and I should have kept them in for longer. Any advice would be much appreciated! Catherine

    Reply
    • Hi Catherine, I’m so glad you and your husband enjoyed my bread recipe! You should be able to bake two (or more) loaves at once, the only possible problem might be that even after you remove the steam source (the tray with hot water at the bottom of the oven), the two loaves will continue to give off steam as they bake – and they will definitely generate more of it than if you baked only one loaf.

      This can make the oven “saturated” with steam in the second part of the bake and hinder further steam evaporation from the loaves, resulting in a wetter, denser crumb. If your loaves were denser and wetter, that might be why. What I’d do is open the oven door slightly a couple of times during the second (steam-free) part of the bake, just to release any extra steam.

      Also, I’d recommend only baking as many loaves as you can comfortably fit on the same, middle rack in the oven. I’m not sure how well the bread would bake on other racks, but likelihood is that either the top or the bottom would burn if you place it on the higher or lower rack in the oven, respectively. Hope this helps!

      Reply
    • Hi Sneha, if the crust was very hard straight out of the oven, it’s possible that you slightly over-baked the bread, maybe try reducing the baking time by 5-10 minutes. If the crust became hard only the next day (or in the days after) it’s possible that the bread dried out very quickly, for whatever reason. How did you store the bread? If the bread was too dense, it’s possible that it needed a slightly longer proofing time.

      Reply
  39. I made your artisan bread. It had very dark color, not at all like your picture but it was excellent. I like your seeded loaf recipe but I just want a white bread that doesn’t require proofing in the refrigerator. Can your recipe be made without the seeds and still work out? The seeds are a wonderful idea but it’s not what I want in my sandwich bread.
    Thank you. Christine

    Reply
    • Hi Christine, did you by any chance use Bob’s Red Mill buckwheat flour to make the artisan bread? Because a couple of other readers have noted that that flour gave their bread a darker colour and sometimes also a slightly unpleasant flavour. The seeded bread will definitely work without the seeds! 🙂

      Reply
  40. Another brilliant recipe, thank you! I have made this twice now and it was great. Toasts wonderfully too! Quick question, if I’m using instant yeast should I reduce the quantity or the rise time at all? I’m finding the loaf to be coming up over the top of the tin really quickly during proofing and it lead to a bit of a muffin top on the first go.

    Reply
    • Hi Alisha, so glad you enjoyed the bread! Instant yeast is often more active than active dried yeast, so use 75% of the amount listed in the recipe. Alternatively, you can use the same amount and just shorten the baking time – once the dough doubles in volume, it’s ready to bake.

      Reply
  41. Hello! This looks amazing. I’m wondering if you could only use rice flour? I can’t use the other ones you recommended. Also, have you tried using any nut flours? Hazelnut or tiger nut?
    If not, I’ll give the nut flours a go and let you know.

    Reply
    • Hi Alicia, you can’t use only rice flour for this recipe – gluten-free bread recipes require a mix of GF flours to get the best results. I haven’t tested nut flours with this recipe, and somehow, I don’t think they will work very well…

      Reply
  42. Tasty, whole grain bread! The recipe works like a charm. I tried it this first time as written. Next time I think I may change it up and use some nuts and dried fruit instead off the seeds for a breakfast bread. I also may try subbing Oats for the buckwheat for variety another time.

    Reply
  43. I’ve been making your GF artisan bread for a few months now and love it so I was anxious to try this one. I love the flavor. It’s great but it’s too wet for my preference. I subbed oat flour for the buckwheat and brown rice flour for the millet. Everything else I followed exactly as your recipe called for – even taking it out of the pan for the last 15 minutes (I actually did 20 minutes) to allow it to dry out. It still came out too wet in my opinion. Is this due to the difference in flours? Also I noticed that steam was rising from the loaf when I took it out of the oven. Should I have left it in the oven until there was no more steam? Just curious how to make it better next time. Yes, there will be a next time!

    Reply
    • Hi Carolyn! When you say “wet” do you mean that it’s sticky to the touch when you cut it, or just that it’s very moist?
      In general, GF bread baked in a loaf tin will almost always be more moist than bread baked free-form in a Dutch oven or skillet, because a smaller surface area is exposed to the hot oven and therefore moisture evaporation from the bread is inhibited. What you could do is bake it longer (directly on the oven rack, out of the pan), which will remove even more moisture and should dry it out further. Just note that it will make the crust even more crisp. As for the steam rising from the bread: that will always happen with freshly baked bread – as the bread cools, it loses even more moisture via steam evaporation (up to 10-20g of its total weight, in fact).

      Reply
      • Thanks for the feedback. I’ll try the longer time out of the pan. And when I said “wet”, I meant sticky/gummy which has made it more difficult to slice easily.

        Reply
    • Hi Annuradha! Adding vinegar creates a slightly acidic environment for the yeast, which makes it more active. I’ve found that adding this small amount of vinegar gives a more open, soft crumb in the final baked bread.

      Reply
  44. The perfect loaf of bread !!
    It’s so incredibly tasty, soft, crunchy and easy to make. Better than what you could get from any bakery. You won’t know it’s gluten free. Everyone loved it.
    Thank you for this piece of heaven!!!

    Reply
  45. Wow wow wow!! This is the best bread I have ever made! Crusty outside. Soft inside. Thank you so much. My family ate half of it and they eat wheat bread. My daughter said she prefers it over ‘normal’ bread.

    Reply
  46. Hi Kat. I’ve made your GF bread from April …. very tastey and easy. Will make this as well. Question: I have a fabulous bread maker, with GF & custom programmable features that I use weekly. Would like to make your breads in that. Any suggestions? Have you ever tried using a breadmaker?

    Reply
    • Hi Linda, I’m really glad you’ve enjoyed my bread recipe! Unfortunately, I have no experience with bread makers, so I can’t really help you there… I believe a few people have successfully made my Ultimate GF Bread with the help of a bread maker (mostly for combining the ingredients and proofing), so it could work. If you give it a try, do let me know how it turns out!

      Reply
  47. On your new gluten free bread recipe there is a discrepancy on how much time the loaf should steam in the oven. #10 says 15 minutes. #11 says after the 20 minutes. My loaf is in the oven now. Since I made your other wonderful gluten free bread and it required 20 minutes to steam in the oven, that’s what I’ll do today.

    Reply
    • Thank you so much for catching that, Theresa! I’ve now corrected it to 15 minutes, but if you went with 20 minutes it shouldn’t make too much of a difference.

      Reply
  48. Thank you- I can’t say how much I enjoy the Ultimate GF bread. It is just amazing. My husband is who is not gf enjoys it enough that I don’t have to deal with separate breads. I can’t wait to try this one. I’ve tried the other with buckwheat, teff, and sorghum and enjoy it each time! I look forward to your book- will preorder.

    Reply
    • Hi Mim, thank you so much for your lovely message, I’m so glad you and your husband both enjoy my GF bread recipe! I really hope you’ll love this one as well – and I hope you’ll enjoy the book!

      Reply
      • Hi Kat, I can’t wait to try this and get your book. Can I reduce yeast to 2 tsp and omit sugar? I have a small oven and I’m afraid the bread might be too close to the heat source. Should cover with foil during the steam baking? Thank you for your advice.

        Reply
        • Hi Stacy, if you want your bread to be smaller, I’d recommend just reducing the whole recipe (for example, halving it). I don’t recommend trying to reduce the yeast to make it rise less, as it will probably turn out too dense. You don’t need to cover it with foil during the first part of baking with steam.

          Reply
  49. Woohoo! Another great bread recipe. I’ve been making the artisan loaf weekly for months but it may be replaced by this! I love that it is super easy and only requires one rise. So quick & simple to make. I did two loaves, one with millet flour and one with brown rice. The brown rice one worked better for me, it held its shape and rose better than the millet one. But both taste delicious!

    *It should be noted that I rarely have luck with millet flour but I think it must be down to the actual flour that I buy, I can only ever get Bob’s Red Mill for millet. I use Anthony’s Organics for everything else and they all work beautifully. I’m in the western US by the way.

    Anyway, great loaf! Happy baking!

    Reply